Steps to DNA Matching and Chromosome Mapping with GEDmatch and Genome Mate

For awhile now, I’ve planned to write a summary of the steps to using GEDmatch and Genome Mate for chromosome mapping. Based on some great feedback and suggestions from Roberta, one of my blog readers, I’m going to go ahead and post this summary now, instead of waiting until I have completed the step by step guides for the entire process. My hope is this will help people to begin making the most efficient use of their DNA data right away, as well as letting people know what topics I will be covering next in the process. As I continue to add the rest of the step by step guides, I will update this post by adding the links to the new guides after I have completed writing them. In addition, I hope to keep evolving this post by incorporating new methods and tools that may become available for working with one’s genealogical DNA data.

[Note: While successful results can be obtained by using a spreadsheet to track one’s data, instead of Genome Mate, I have not found any benefit to doing so. Instead, I have been much more successful working with my DNA data, and determining shared ancestors with my matches, by using Genome Mate. It’s a great program, and I highly recommend those people currently using spreadsheets take a look a Genome Mate to see if it may make the management of your data easier for you, as it did for me. Consequently, I have no plans at this time to add any step by step instructions for using spreadsheets to this guide.]

1) Create a GEDmatch profile.

For instructions on creating a GEDmatch profile, see steps one through three of How To Upload Your Ancestry DNA Test Results To GEDmatch. [Note: Even though the article lists Ancestry DNA in the title, steps one through three apply universally to creating a GEDmatch profile, no matter which DNA testing company you have used.]

2) Download your DNA raw data file from your testing company.

For Ancestry DNA download instructions, see How To Download Your Ancestry DNA Test Results.

For Family Tree DNA and 23andMe download instructions, see the GEDmatch wiki, which is located in the Learn More section of the GEDmatch home page. The download instructions are found by clicking the DNA Upload link on the GEDmatch wiki main page.

3) Upload your DNA raw data file to GEDmatch.

For instructions on uploading an Ancestry DNA raw data file to GEDmatch, see How To Upload Your Ancestry DNA Test Results To GEDmatch and jump to step 4.

For instructions on uploading a Family Tree DNA or 23andMe raw data file to GEDmatch, see the GEDmatch wiki, which is located in the Learn More section of the GEDmatch home page. The upload instructions are found by clicking the DNA Upload link on the GEDmatch wiki main page.

4) Create a database and profile in Genome Mate to track your data.

For instructions on creating a profile in Genome Mate, see Introduction To Genome Mate.

5) Run a one to many comparison of your test results at GEDmatch after batch processing of your file has completed.

For instructions on how to run a one to many comparison, see Using GEDmatch Part 2 (The One-To-Many Comparison Tool).

6) Import your one to many comparison results into Genome Mate using the Load GEDmatch Chromosome Browser Data import option.

For instructions on how to do this import, see Using Genome Mate Part 3 (Importing GEDmatch Chromosome Browser Data)

7) Import the email addresses of all your one to many comparison matches into Genome Mate using the Load/Update GEDmatch Relatives Records import option.

For instructions on how to do this import, see Using Genome Mate (Importing/Updating the email addresses of your matches from GEDmatch).

8) Identify triangulated groups and confirm segments.

For instructions on how to identify triangulated groups and confirm segments, see Using Genome Mate (Identify triangulated groups and confirm segments).

9) Add confirmed segments to chromosome map.

For instructions on how to add confirmed segments to chromosome map, see Using Genome Mate (Add confirmed segments to chromosome map).

10) Import the triangulated segments of your four hundred closest matches into Genome Mate.

For instructions on how to import the triangulated segments of your four hundred closest matches into Genome Mate, see Using GEDmatch (The Triangulation Tool).

I hope this outline is helpful. If you notice any errors or omissions in these steps, or have any suggestions for improving/streamlining the process or requests for additional guides, please send me an email or add a comment below.

This article last updated 13 May 2015

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20 thoughts on “Steps to DNA Matching and Chromosome Mapping with GEDmatch and Genome Mate

    • Hi Smh,

      Sorry to hear you are problems. Can you please give me some more specifics (such as what type of problem you’re having, or on what step the problem occurred) so I can help you.

      Thank you,

      Dan

      • Thanks for responding. When I add the gedmatch 1-to-many matches into the Gedmatch chromosome browser data, I get the message, “Gedmatch page pasted is invalid for this function”.

  1. Thanks for the additional information. This error message indicates the data is trying to be imported into Genome Mate using the wrong import function. For example, mistakenly pasting one to one match results into the chromosome browser import data box, or vice versa. Another possibility is if you are trying to paste the one to many results into the chromosome browser import data box, without having selected your matches and generating the chromosome browser results page before copying and pasting. Check to make sure you are selecting the option titled (1) Load GEDmatch Chromosome Browser Data when pasting the chromosome browser results. Please let me know whether or not this resolves the problem for you.

  2. Pingback: Using Genome Mate (Importing/Updating the email addresses of your matches from GEDmatch) | Adventures In Genealogy Research: No Stone Unturned/The Wright Stuff

  3. Your information is invaluable. I’ve been using gedmatch for a while and have spreadsheets on my computer and piles of paper everywhere. I started using genome mate yesterday and can already see how much this is going to streamline things for me. I’ve read your previous blogs and they are well-written and clear enough for a non-techie like me to follow along. I look forward to Steps 8-10!
    Thank you so much.

    • Thank you very much for your feedback and encouragement, Carolyn. I’m glad you have found the Genome Mate software and instructions to be of help. The software has certainly made a big difference for me in terms of making it easier to spot shared segments, and manage all the data and correspondence between matches. I am working on the next installment of instructions, and hope yo have it posted soon.

  4. Pingback: Using Genome Mate (Identify triangulated groups and confirm segments) | Adventures In Genealogy Research: No Stone Unturned/The Wright Stuff

  5. Pingback: Using Genome Mate (Add confirmed segments to chromosome map) | Adventures In Genealogy Research: No Stone Unturned/The Wright Stuff

  6. Dan, I’m glad to find your site. I am a new user o GENOME Mate and I am having funny problems using GEDMATCH data. I use it primarily for new relatives from Ancestry. In my primary database with my one profile, I cannot get the Import data 1 on 1 to enter a new relative. I know I am using the correct steps, because I can open a New database with profile, and it works fine. What could be causing the problem with my primary database?

    • Hi Larry,

      Sorry to hear of your problems. I’m not sure from your description specifically what is causing the problem, so I have a couple questions for you to see if we can get things working again.

      In your primary database, when you try to import a GEDmatch one to one comparison, what happens specifically? Do you get an error message, or does everything seem to go fine without an error message but no data is imported, or does something else happen? If you get an error message, what exactly does it say? Do the other import options seem to work correctly in your primary database?

      Please let me know the answers to these questions so I can assist further.

      Thanks,

      Dan

      • Dan, Since I’ve already generated a csv file, and used the generic imput, I’ll have to think about how to check it. I guess I need to delete the data that’s in place for a match? What is the best way to do hat?

      • I searched the Relatives, found the record , deleted it. I then did the import from GEDMATCH and it worked fine. I must have been doing something wrong before. I’m using GEDMATCH only for my Ancestry matches that I’ve talked through the process of getting their info into GEDMATCH. Any benefit of doing it for my FTDNA and 23andme matches?

      • Larry,

        I’m glad to hear that your problem seems to have been resolved. If you run into the problem again, please let me know.

        In regards to your question, I would say there is definitely a benefit to having any of your FTDNA and 23andme matches upload to GEDmatch. By doing so, they will have some matches at GEDmatch that they will not have at their respective testing company, and these additional matches may provide clues to help break down a genealogical brick wall. The more comparisons that can be done the better, in my opinion.

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